FINA

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Fontes Inediti Numismaticae Antiquae (FINA) aims at collecting, reading, studying and publishing unprinted textual evidence related to ancient coins created before 1800.

In addition to the great amount of new information on numismatic topics that FINA provides, the project proves also important in a broader perspective as it adds information for reconstructing the history of ideas within each scholarly social network, documented here in the FINA Wiki.

The "" brings together evidence primarily about numismatic correspondence that was exchanged before 1800 and is part of the project "Fontes Inediti Numismaticae Antiquae (FINA)".

The  Wikidata Q100989339 is the online version of the "" that makes its content available on the Internet, thereby inviting researchers to collaboratively collect further resources.
FINA Wiki
The "Grand Document" brings together evidence primarily about numismatic correspondence that was exchanged before 1800 and is part of the project "Fontes Inediti Numismaticae Antiquae (FINA)". The FINA Wiki Wikidata Q100989339 is the online version of the "Grand Document" that makes its content available on the Internet, thereby inviting researchers to collaboratively collect further resources.
When the Kunstkammer of the Dukes of Bavaria in Munich was plundered by the Swedes in the Thirty Years War, one of its most prestigious items, Jacopo Strada’s corpus of numismatic drawings, was split up. Martin Mulsow and his collaborators aim at studying and reuniting this voluminous corpus.
Jacopo Strada’s Magnum ac Novum Opus: A Sixteenth-Century Numismatic Corpus
When the Kunstkammer of the Dukes of Bavaria in Munich was plundered by the Swedes in the Thirty Years War, one of its most prestigious items, Jacopo Strada’s corpus of numismatic drawings, was split up. Martin Mulsow and his collaborators aim at studying and reuniting this voluminous corpus.
This research project on the life and work of the Austrian numismatist Joseph Eckhel (1737‒1798) is based at the Austrian Academy of Sciences (Vienna) and directed by Bernhard Woytek. Eckhel’s scholarly correspondence is currently being edited for the first time, with a detailed numismatic and historical commentary.
Joseph Eckhel (1737‒1798) and his numismatic network
This research project on the life and work of the Austrian numismatist Joseph Eckhel (1737‒1798) is based at the Austrian Academy of Sciences (Vienna) and directed by Bernhard Woytek. Eckhel’s scholarly correspondence is currently being edited for the first time, with a detailed numismatic and historical commentary.
About 150 letters written by Hans von Schellenberg to a coin collector friend, Johann Jacob Rüeger, have survived. They have been stored for centuries in the Universitätsbibliothek in Basel. About 10 % of the letters, written between 1595 and 1606, is dedicated to numismatic and archaeological issues.
The letters of Hans of Schellenberg
About 150 letters written by Hans von Schellenberg to a coin collector friend, Johann Jacob Rüeger, have survived. They have been stored for centuries in the Universitätsbibliothek in Basel. About 10 % of the letters, written between 1595 and 1606, is dedicated to numismatic and archaeological issues.
After investigating the life and work of the “father of ancient numismatics” in the project Joseph Eckhel (1737‒1798) and his numismatic network, the Vienna team is back with a new research initiative that explores the very roots of the “Vienna School of Numismatics”.
The numismatic networks of Eckhel’s Austrian precursors
After investigating the life and work of the “father of ancient numismatics” in the project Joseph Eckhel (1737‒1798) and his numismatic network, the Vienna team is back with a new research initiative that explores the very roots of the “Vienna School of Numismatics”.
The aim of this three-year project, financed by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research from 2009 to 2012, was a comparative analysis of the image of ancient culture and history from 49 BC to AD 96 as drafted by scholars and antiquaries in the Renaissance on the basis of ancient coins.
Translatio nummorum – The Perception of Classical Antiquity via Ancient Coins by Antiquaries in the Renaissance
The aim of this three-year project, financed by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research from 2009 to 2012, was a comparative analysis of the image of ancient culture and history from 49 BC to AD 96 as drafted by scholars and antiquaries in the Renaissance on the basis of ancient coins.
The goals of the project Fontes Inediti Numismaticae Antiquae (FINA) are to collect, read, study and publish unprinted textual evidence related to ancient coins created before 1800...